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Bizzarrini is back

1 year ago

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Writer:

Andrew Frankel | Ti co-founder

Date:

1 February 2023

This is the Bizzarrini Giotto, a new supercar named after the original company founded by Giotto Bizzarrini. You’ll be seeing what they did there.

It is the second product of the relaunched Bizzarrini company, after its painstaking re-creation of the fearsome 1960s 5300 GT (read our original story here) and is part of a 10-year plan to establish the Bizzarrini name among ‘the very best performance brands in the world.’

Bizzarrini Giotto
Bizzarrini Giotto

The Giotto has been designed by the – and for once the word is appropriate – legendary Giorgetto Giugiaro in association with his son Fabrizio. We only have a sketch of the car right now, but if the reality lives up in any way to the visual impact of the drawing, it’s going to be quite something to see when it starts testing in 2024. Giugiaro senior says his aim was to ‘honour the past but focus entirely on the future.’

Bizzarrini Giotto

As is the way with such things, Bizzarrini is not about to give us chapter and verse about the new car just yet, preferring to dangle tasty morsels of information, designed to keep us just hungry enough to always be wanting more and maintain media (and therefore prospect) interest until launch. So essentially no technical information has been released save for the fact it’s powered by ‘an exclusive, naturally aspirated V12 engine’ and an eight-speed dual-clutch gearbox.

Bizzarrini Giotto

From whence might said motor be sourced? It’s tempting to say Lamborghini because Bizzarrini designed the V12 used for the very first Lambo in 1963, and which stayed in production until the last Murcielago rolled off the line in 2010. But we’d guess Ferrari is more likely, not least because unlike Lamborghini’s current V12 which uses a robotised manual transmission, Ferrari’s comes with the aforementioned eight-speed DCT. And Giotto did design the 250 GTO…

Bizzarrini Giotto

Encouragingly for those interested in how such a car might drive, that job has been given to Chris Porritt who has brought himself out of apparent early retirement (following short stints at Rimac and Tesla and, before that, 15 years determining how Aston Martins should feel) to engineer the Giotto. As yet no information on price or volume has been released, but if you use ‘plenty’ and ‘not many’ as your guide, you’re unlikely to be too far out.

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